5th Annual Conference, May 25, 2017

17Innovations in Translating Injury Research into Effective Prevention

Thursday, May 25, 2017
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM 

Columbia University
722 West 168th Street, 8th Floor Auditorium
New York, NY 10032

Register Now Online

Preliminary Agenda

Come meet injury prevention colleagues, network and learn cutting-edge and best practices in injury control and prevention. The morning keynote speaker is Dr. Charles Branas, new chair of the epidemiology department at Columbia University and an expert on injury and violence prevention. The afternoon keynote speaker is Dr. Cassandra Crifasi, winner of the Jess Kraus Award in Injury Epidemiology in 2016 for her research on injuries among law enforcement officers.

During a complimentary lunch and networking breaks discuss your questions and injury prevention issues on road safety, prescription drugs, trauma center verification, violence and other topics.

Please make plans to join us.

Sincerely,

Guohua Li, DrPH, MD
Professor and Director

Barbara Barlow, MD
Professor Emeritus & Associate Director

Advanced Methods and Designs Applied in Injury Epidemiology and Prevention, May 24, 2017

PRE-EPIC: May 24, 2017 // 1:30 PM – 5:30 PM

This course will introduce students to contemporary analytic methods and innovative designs applied to injury epidemiology and the science of prevention. The course will be taught by accomplished researchers and experienced instructors, and will combine lectures with interactive discussions. Selected readings will ground students and build on the course material presented. Speakers will differ each year covering advanced analytic issues in injury research as well as advanced research designs for multifaceted approaches to injury prevention and reduction. The title, speakers and several objectives are updated each year to reflect the specific topics covered. These applied topics will include both unintentional and intentional injuries, such as motor vehicle crashes, falls, drug overdose, child abuse, youth violence, self-harm and assault.

The applied topics in injury research for 2017, include: 1) Complex Systems Approaches; 2) Application of the Decomposition Method; and 3) Implementation Theories, Frameworks and Designs.

Instructors

  • Thelma Mielenz, PT, PhD, MS, OCS
  • Guohua Li, MD, DrPH
  • Melissa Tracy, PhD

Objectives

By the end of the course, participants will be able to

  • Define IS and related terminologies
  • Discuss methodologies used in IS
  • Formulate an IS question
  • Discuss the benefits of IS and its role in public health programs

EARLY DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE UNTIL APRIL 1, 2017

REGISTRATION OPEN THROUGH MAY 1, 2017

Visit cuepisummer.org for a full list of courses offered in EPIC 2017

 

2017 Injury Cluster Seminars

(Download printable PDF)

 

All of the seminars listed below will be held from 12:00-1:00 pm in the Hammer Health Sciences Building (701 West 168th Street, Rm LL 208-B). Lunch will be served.

JANUARY 19, 2017
The influence of firearm legislation on violence: Evidence from U.S. and international studies
Julian Santaella, DrPH Student
DrPH Candidate, Epidemiology Department, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

FEBRUARY 2, 2017
Does child maltreatment predict sensation seeking trajectories?
Silvia S. Martins, MD, PHD
Associate Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

MARCH 23, 2017
The transmission of violence within social networks
Melissa Tracy, PhD
SUNY Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Albany-SUNY

APRIL 27, 2017
Environmental justice, traffic safety, and street design: Preliminary results from New York City’s Neighborhood Slow Zones
Jonas Hagen, PhD Student
PhD Candidate, NSF IGERT Fellow, PhD Program in Urban Planning; Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation; Columbia University

MAY 1, 2017
Where do bike lanes work best? Using spatial epidemiology methods to improve road safety in our cities
Christopher Morrison, PhD, MPH
Postdoctoral Fellow, Penn Injury Science Center, University of Pennsylvania

4th Annual Conference, June 16, 2016

17Innovations in Translating Injury Research into Effective Prevention

Thursday June 16, 2016
9:00 AM to 4:00 PM 

Columbia University
722 West 168th Street, 8th Floor Auditorium
New York, NY 10032

Register Now Online

Come meet injury prevention colleagues, network and learn cutting edge and best practices in injury prevention. The morning keynote speaker is Dr. David Hemenway, faculty at Harvard University and noted author on firearm safety. Dr. Ted Miller will speak in the afternoon on conducting cost benefit analyses of injury prevention programs. Additional sessions will provide updates and best practices on program evaluation, fall prevention, road safety, prescription drugs and  conducting injury prevention for American College of Surgeons accreditation. During a complimentary lunch and networking breaks discuss your questions and injury prevention issues on road safety, prescription drugs, trauma center verifications, violence and other topics. Registration is free.

Please make plans to join us.

Sincerely,

Joyce Pressley, PhD, MPH
Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention at Columbia University (CIEPAC)
jp376@cumc.columbia.edu
212-342-0421

The Injury Times – Prescription Drug and Substance Use Safety

The latest issue of The Injury Times has been published, focusing on the topic of Prescription Drug and Substance Use Safety.

Articles include:

  • UNINTENTIONAL DRUG OVERDOSE DEATHS
  • LEGALIZATION OF MARIJUANA LAWS
  • STATEN ISLAND OVERDOSE PREVENTION
  • DRUG FREE SCHOOL ZONE
  • DRIVING WHILE IMPAIRED
  • NYC INJECTING DRUG USER INITIATIVE
  • DESIGNER DRUGS CREATE NEW SAFETY RISKS
  • SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND TRANSPORTATION
  • MEASURES TO CONTROL SYNTHETIC DRUG USE

Download the Prescription Drug and Substance Use Safety issue of The Injury Times

 

 

 

Injury Prevention Center Seminar Provides Much Needed Help

by E. Lenita Johnson (estelljohnson@sbcglobal.net)

Phenomenal and empowering are just two of the words attendees used to describe the 3rd Annual Innovations in Translating Injury Research into Effective Prevention Seminar sponsored by the Center for Injury Epidemiology and Research at Columbia University. The daylong event offered injury prevention colleagues the opportunity to network and learn about cutting edge research and best practices in injury prevention.

Kim Wiley-Schwartz, the Assistant Commissioner for Education and Outreach of the New York City Department of Transportation speaks on Vision Zero.

Kim Wiley-Schwartz, the Assistant Commissioner for Education and Outreach of the New York City Department of Transportation speaks on Vision Zero.

American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma representative Glen Tinkoff, MD, FACS, FCCM says this seminar was paramount. “This is a major university and a major city with presentations made by professionals who understand the language, the need and the operations of injury prevention,” Tinkoff said during an interview prior to the seminar.

“It is paramount because we have not been in the public eye and that has been a problem with injury prevention with our outreach to our communities, our politicians, our legislators and our patients. We are not informing them well and so these venues are exceptionally important.”

Dr. Guohua Li, the Director of the Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention at Columbia University and the editor of The Springer Open-Access Journal, Injury Epidemiology understands the value of communication, partnerships, the Center and its work; and, he says the Center is doing what it can to contribute to change. “The significance of Columbia’s CDC funded Injury Control Research Center has been immeasurable. The Center has helped us to put injury prevention on the academic map of the University and the Mailman School of Public Health, develop well-structured coursework for Doctoral and Masters Students, add injury prevention to the mission statement of Columbia; and, most importantly when it comes to outreach, the Center helped expand and address priority areas of injury facing the nation and its most vulnerable population groups while strengthening collaborative efforts with colleagues at the University, in the region, in health departments, and in communities not only in this area but across the country.”

Barbara Barlow, MD, Columbia’s Injury Control Research Center Associate Director and Co-Director of Outreach says this is what the CDC wants. “The CDC wants you to have more than research and data. They want you to use the data to translate into action to improve community health and safety for children and their families,” Barlow says, “Most of the people attending the Columbia seminar like many health care professionals have never walked outside of their hospital walls, and that is what outreach is all about.” She went on to say the doctors, nurses and the community outreach workers need to walk outside the hospital walls and help the communities they serve in and help solve their health problems. “To just treat trauma and not try to prevent it is just absolutely immoral. As a physician you have an obligation not only to treat disease, sickness and injury but also to contribute to the community’s health and wellbeing.”

The Center, seminar and Injury Free outreach efforts are resources that could probably be of use to every injury prevention group in the Northeastern part of the country according to New York State Department of Health Bureau of Occupational Health and Injury Director Kitty Gelberg, PhD, MPH. “People need to recognize your existence, reach out to you and work with you. This wealth of experience and knowledge is not just State based,” she said. “If you go into injury prevention and you feel like you are alone doing this, it gets very overwhelming very quickly because of all of the different types of injuries. It helps to realize there are already people out there doing this, you are not alone, you don’t have to recreate the wheel, the template is there and you can follow it.” She says she believes that was the message for attendees and it came across very well.

Just over 60 people attended the event, and they heard from a variety of industry experts. In addition to having Kim Wiley-Schwartz, the Assistant Commissioner for Education and Outreach of the New York City Department of Transportation who spoke on The Vision Zero initiative: An update on New York City‘s approach to reducing traffic fatalities and injuries, and New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Assistant Commissioner Hillary Kunins, MD, MPH, MS who spoke on Prescription drug initiatives in New York City, those in attendance heard from six physicians and injury prevention outreach professionals from the Injury Free Coalition for Kids®, a national injury prevention outreach program that is among the country’s premier injury prevention programs and the outreach arm of the Injury Center.

In addition to presentations, attendees had the opportunity to participate in roundtable discussions on a variety of injury topics including trauma center verifications, Department of Transportation and Department of Health injury prevention initiatives including violence and road safety. They also had the opportunity to talk about: child injury prevention, elderly falls, violence prevention initiatives, ACS Trauma Center certification and publishing and disseminating injury and injury prevention science.

Roundtable discussions during lunch offered the opportunity for extended conversations, teachable moments and questions.

Roundtable discussions during lunch offered the opportunity for extended conversations, teachable moments and questions.

“This seminar was great. I really enjoyed it and I learned a lot. The speakers are informative, enthusiastic and very knowledgeable,” Deborah Travis, Trauma Program Manager of St. Lukes Hospital said. “I am new to injury prevention and it has helped me to verify that I am on the right track and given me some new ideas.” Her sentiments were echoed by Dekeya Slaughter of Bellevue. “I have attended previous seminars, but in my new role as Injury Prevention Coordinator this one provided me contacts I can call. It has been great.”

Few would question the need for more seminars like this one. Tinkoff says most recent research shows there are only so many lives we can save in acute care and injury prevention is the new frontier in reducing the burden of injury in the US and worldwide. He concluded the interview by saying until it is better addressed injury will remain the biggest killer of our population between the ages of 1 and 44 and it will continue to rob the population with more years of life lost than any other entity that we have.

The course Director was Joyce Pressley, PhD, MPH Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Health Policy and Management at CUMC, and Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention at Columbia University, Outreach Co-Director.